Aerial of Yagan Square with a pattern on the canopy and indigenous painting on the Digital Tower
Category
News
Date
29 March 2019

Yagan Square leads Australia in urban renewal

  • Yagan Square

Yagan Square has taken out two coveted industry awards at the Urban Development Institute of Australia (UDIA) National Awards for Excellence.

The project was recognised for Excellence in Urban Renewal and was also awarded the prestigious President’s Award at the national UDIA event.

Yagan Square outshone other projects from across the country due to its unique and iconic architecture and design, innovative construction over active rail tunnels and intensive community and Aboriginal consultation, which has infused indigenous history and character into its design and facilities.

The prestigious UDIA President’s Award is reserved for the best of the winners from all categories, across the whole country. The project was recognised for being a best practice example of how urban renewal can change a desolate and geographically divided space and bring people together to meet, connect, discover and celebrate.

Acting Chief Executive Officer Sean Henriques said the project came from a long-term need to better connect the city and provide a space for people to meet, connect, discover and celebrate.

“Yagan Square is the flagship public space that realised cross-government efforts to reconnect the city of Perth after a 100-year divide," he said.

"In the place where Perth’s bus and rail networks literally converge, MRA has delivered an ambitious, innovative and exciting urban space that restores connectivity between the entertainment hub of Northbridge and Perth’s CBD.”

Mr Henriques said the level of consultation with traditional landowners set an important new benchmark in Australia, and was made possible by strong working relations with the Whadjuk Working Party.

“The space is the first significant place in an Australian city to recognise an Aboriginal person," he said.

"It is a place of reconciliation, which reflects the stories of the Whadjuk people and elevates visitors’ knowledge, interest and experience of Aboriginal culture.”